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, if we go out there to wilkes barre now, do you think we could find george washington, thomas jefferson, james madison, george mason, john marshall and patrick henry? we ain't going to find them. now, at some theoretical level they are there. that is, human beings with the capacity for leadership are there, but the situation doesn't permit that group to rise to the surface. and so the question is, why did that situation exist in 1776? now, there is another answer to this, which is that great leadership only emerges during times of great crisis. and this makes eminent sense, the pressure that the crisis creates. and yet we can all think of examples where there's a great crisis and there's no leadership. like now. [laughter] [applause] >> or the coming of your -- world war i in europe. so what was special, you can't say there was something special in the water back there then. you can't say god looked down upon the american college and bless them. supernatural explanations are not admitted. even if you're an evangelical you're not allowed to use those in a historical conversation. i don't
on washington with those who lived it. >>> yesterday tens of thousands of americans converged on the nation's capital to commemorate the 50 th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. it was a historic event that spurred the enactment of the civil rights and voting rights act and one that is now remembered as one of the moral high points of american history. but that is not what political leaders, major media outlets and millions of everyday americans were expecting right up until that march began in 1963. they were bracing for violence and chaos. they were fearing strident and inflammatory rhetoric and they were convinced the main effect of the rally would be to inflict a grievous wound, maybe even a fatal wound, on a very movement it sought to advance. that is the context in which the march took place 50 years ago this week. context that can and all too often is lost to history. it came at a particularly crucial and politically sensitive time in the civil rights movement. three months before the march, in may of 1963, demonstrations in birmingham -- excuse me, demonstrators in birming
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
of blacks in the white house. >> yes. >> this is a q&a for a couple of years ago about the martha washington's slave -- pick it up at the end. >> she found out early 1796 that martha washington was planning to give her away as a wedding gift. during slavery, slaves were given away. this was upsetting for her. because when they died, they would free individuals who were slave to them. and she had hoped down the road she would be out of the institution. but if she's going to be given away, that meant her whole life was going to be in slavery. she's going make plans to escape. she writes, she talks about later, one evening, late spring, 1796 while the washingtons were silting at the dinner table waiting for her to serve them, she went out the back door. rather than say, you know, she escaped, we don't like it, but we'll leave it alone. george decides to kidnap her. they send a nephew back to kidnap her which was actually fairly common. >> how many stories in history like this, slaves in the white house? >> many stories. there were african-americans in the white house, except the james buchanan
on anniversary of the march on washington, and the legacy of martin luther king jr.. series, first ladies, influence and image. over the next couple of hours, we will visit places with history curators. away fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support sys
-span. programs on every first lady, from martha washington. tonight, elizabeth munro and catherine adams. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> elizabeth monroe was a true partner in her husband's career. they were a love story and absolutely devoted to each other. elizabeth monroe had a well- developed sense of style and image. this is a woman who knew how to carry herself with great elegance. >> it is called the era of good feeling. >> this is a woman who spoke french. >> very great beauty. she received is seldom anything in the white house. she hated it. >> dignity, civility. those are the words that come to mind. >> elizabeth monroe served as first lady from 1817 to 1825 as a time known as the era of good feeling. coming up, we will explore her life and what were not always happy times inside the white house for this woman born into a well-to-do new york family. she married james monroe at the age of 17 and traveled new york extensively with him. she brought with her to the white house a certain french
morning, august 15. ahead on the "washington journal ," your reaction to the latest development in egypt and what the u.s. response should be. you should join the conversation at (202) 585-3880, our line for republicans. (202) 585-3881 for democrats. we also have our line for independents at (202) 585-3882. join us on facebook, send us a tweet, or e-mail address, journal@c-span.org. at somegin with a look of the headlines from outside the u.s., the "guardian" newspaper -- egypt's bloody crackdown. when the story first went to prince, the death toll was 200 78. overnight, the death toll has been updated to 421. there is this from the "miami killed asundreds egypt's forces storm the protest camps. a similar headline from "usa today," egypt the reps in chaos. -- a reps and chaos. from the "wall street journal" website -- egypt's military regime a reps setting off a day of violence that left at least 421 people dead. the government fractured and ties with its international partners in tatters. cairo streets were calm this morning following the curfew overnight with funerals for the dead. fur
have a dream" speech at the lincoln memorial, and thousands today are gathering on the washington mall to celebrate that historic event. >>> we start in syria where the government is now accusing rebel forces of using chemical weapons. the claim comes as president obama meets with his national security team at the white house to talk about the reports of chemical weapons attacks by the syrian government. syrian state tv says soldiers found chemical weapons in tunnels used by rebels. cnn cannot confirm those claims or the authenticity of these images. the opposition claims government forces launched a nerve gas attack, killing hundreds of civilians. meanwhile a top u.n. official is in damascus today asking to investigate the alleged use of chemical weapons by the syrian government. president obama sat down with our chris kuomo earlier and he said the u.s. is still gathering information on the attack. >> what we've seen indicates that this is clearly a big event of grave concern. and we are already in communications with the entire international community. we're moving through the u.n. t
at a march on washington event at union temple church in d.c. d.c friends say he was a mediator within the community and had plans to run for commissioner. >> events commemorating the 50th anniversary on the march on washington go full steam today. >> memorial circle will remain r open unless it need it's be closed for pedestrian safety tomorrow. participates are encouraged to take public transportation to the march and ral i. why another rally held tomorrow, the d.c. statehood and self determination march and rally.ly >> the mayor was among those in attendance at freedom applausall activities gathering at the d.c. war memorial at 9:00 tomorrow t morning and then they'll head to the lincoln memorial at 9:30 for the march. ahead of the anniversary of the march the post office will release a new forever stamptamp today. the big reveal will be made on o facebook and actress gabrielle union will be on that event. >> all right. here is a question for you. were you at the march on washington? do you have family members therm or friends who were there? we'll even share your story with us. sen
in the 1963 march on washington remember the events of that day in a discussion hosted by the martin luther king, jr. memorial library in washington, d.c. this is an hour 30 minutes. >> when our archivist suggested that i conduct oral histories with people that attended the march, i jumped at the opportunity to hear firsthand accounts of the days that i, like many of you, had only known about in books, photos and media reflections. i was curious about literal and other journeys that people took to get to the lincoln memorial on that hot august day in 1963. we put out a call for people it into the march to be interviewed and the panelists here today were the first to answer that call. it is important to note that this is the beginning of an ongoing project and derek and our collection not only oral histories but also memorabilia and other artifacts from the march to the washingtonian the community archive. two of the panelists, peter bailey and doctor ella kelly were right under my nose as their regular attendees to the black studies lecture series that takes place in the black study center
which found the unemployment rate went up in 28 state and declined in eight states. "washington journal" is next. >> the president's plan to try to keep college more affordable is already getting some reaction from capitol hill. we might have to weigh in. some are in support and some are critical saying the new ranging system that the president put out is arbitrary. meantime college can cost up to $30,000 year on average now for some folks and the debt load students carrying can be the same amount. with that background is the cost of college worth it? that's the question for you this friday morning. republicans call 202-585-3881, democrats 202-585-3880 and independents 202-585-3882. look forward to your calls and also your participation by social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter @c-span wj. you can also send an e-mail journal@c-span.org. is the cost of college worth it? allen writes, it used to be but right now it slightly losing steam. now people that are caught with a minimum of expectations while being strapped with a new burden of paying back the loan making short m
anniversary of the march on washington. wasn't it exciting to see the enthusiasm and the film of the people of the day? who could have expected so many of us would be here who had ties to all that was owing on? who could suspect that we would all be with john lewis? [applause] attorney general, mr. mayor, you honor us with your presence. .he fierce urgency of now words rang out across the national mall, the call echoed in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slo
, extra, read all about it! "washington post" has been sold! whoa! hey, good morning, everybody. nation's capital waking up to that shocking bit of news this morning and people all around the country talking about it, as well. good morning, good morning, great to see you. it's a tuesday. tuesday, august 6th, in fact. and we are here in our nation's capital, booming out to you all across this great land of ours on your local progressive talk radio station, lucky if you've got one and give them your full support and on current tv for another week and a day here. and we're glad to be with you whether you're watching or listening, keep up with us here on the "full court press" and join the conversation. because our job is to let you know what's going on this morning here in our nation's capital, around the country and around the globe. your job is to tell us what you think about it all. and what you think we ought to be doing about it. 1-866-55-press is your ticket. that's our toll free number. 1-866-55-press. and then you go on twitter, if you prefer. give us your comments at bpshow or on
is speak the truth. secondly, there is a new generation of leaders stepping forward in washington. new, young at leaders, people like rand paul and marco rubio and mike lee and kelly ayotte. [applause] you know what is incredible? five years ago, not one of them was in office. you have to go back to after world war ii to see an instance where the generation of leaders who were effectively defending free-market principles is a new generation stepping forward -- let me suggest something. if you look at that new generation, they are almost always exactly the same age. was 10 whence, i ronald reagan became president. i was 18 when ronald reagan left the white house. know how for the world war ii generation, many of them would prefer to fdr as "our president?" i will go to my grave with ronald reagan defining what it means to be present. -- president. [applause] he didn't blink. i have referred to this next generation, this new generation as the children of reagan. listen to them communicate. listen to kelly stand up and talk about free-market principles. listen to marco. listen to rent. --
jefferson, lincoln, washington had fought for. the only, i think, two pieces of oratory that would rival it would be fdr's, the only thing we have to fear is fear itself and president kennedy inaugural address. martin luther king joined the founding fathers 50 years ago today. >> reverend al sharpton obviously an important event 50 years ago. 50 years laterer there will be an african-american president going to commemorate this moment. what an extraordinary journey it has been and the journey, as you say every day and as all americans understand, the journey continues. what do you want to hear from the president of the united states today? >> well, i think that what we want to hear is a commitment to continue that journey but to also salute the fact that we have made the journey. we met with him two days ago after having a huge march on saturday about the issues now. and one of the things that i said is that i feel that he should not be compared to dr. king. he is the president. we want to hear from him as the generation before us heard from kennedy about what we are going to do. so i th
that was water. the river came in much closer. it is now washington. as you walk that in fact was the nec as you come in from now the south bend and to boston. it was one of dozens to occupy the gigantic boston harbor and the british had the needy. they kept the entrance open so they could get provisions whether they be from england or from canada. this meant that even though they were completely surrounded by land, boston as a british occupied garrison wasn't going to start. in june of 1775 and this was a battle like none other to it like a terrified young spectator event for those not only living in boston, but in towns around all of the roots of boston were filled with people watching as more than 2,000 regulars made their way across the harbor and the charles river to the charlestown peninsula and began the assault that would erupt into the battle of bunker hill. so this was something viewed by anyone here and then there would settle into a stalemate that would then have george washington archive and that would change anything. and then eventually in march 17, 1776, the british would be forc
hosted by the stemson center in washington, d.c. included analysts like stuart bolin, inspector general for iraq reconstruction and his recent report arguing that a the u.s. does not have a well executed plan to implement and oversee the reconstruction efforts. defense department and u.n. officials also participated in the discussion. this is an hour and a half. >> good morning everyone. i am ellen laipson and i'm delighted to welcome you to the stimson center for this muggy of this conversation about war and peace new tools for messy transition. we are gathering at the time that we can see the end of both the iraq and afghanistan engagement, and this event in a way is pivoted around the offer by the special inspector general for the iraqi reconstruction to present some of the findings for the final report so the special inspector general office created in 2004 is now completing its work so it is a moment of reflection and looking back at what are some of the lessons of iraq, but we know that iraq is such an out liar and may be such an exception in the kind of engagement both the united
after the march on washington, let us remember that dr. king's last march was never finished. the poor people's campaign was never finished. some 50 years after the march on washington, while if you were -- you are people as a percentage in our country are poor, more as a number in our country are poor. while the ladder of opportunity extends to the heavens for our people today, more are tethered at the bottom and falling off everyday. say that thean distance between a child's aspirations represented by the top of that letter and a family situation at the bottom of that is the exactder measurement of that aaron's level of frustration. as we go home today, let us remember that the dreamer was also a doer. as we turn on our tvs tomorrow and see people walking out of places where they are being forced to survive on $7.25 by the thousands, let us commit to join them in fighting to lift up the bottom. at the top of that letter has extended, the tethers at the bottom must be unleashed. let us not just be dreamers. let us recommit to be doers. thank you, and god bless. [applause] >> from dest
suit tomorrow after one more vote on health care. summer break is upon us here in washington, d.c. one headline says lawmakers are leaving capitol hill pretty empty-handed. both sides are pointing fingers at each other. want to get your thoughts this thursday morning on the congressional session thus far, what is being done and perhaps not being done. here are the numbers. if not by sound, you can send aus a tweet. you can post your comment on facebook and you can send us an e-mail. we look forward to hearing from you. here is one of the headlines this morning in "the huffington post" -- they're talking about congressman harold rogers, the republican of kentucky who chairs the appropriations committee. writes about this as well. russell permanent shares the byline and joins us by phone. burman shares the by line. guest: pretty interesting day in the house yesterday. they were considering a house appropriations bill to fund the department of transportation and housing and urban development. this has been a key bill implementing deep cuts offered by congressman paul ryan. they effectivel
opinion, and shaken policymakers in washington that it could very well end up being the gang changer. in terms of the short-term tactical strategy whethe whatevy end up doing, whether it nothing or cruise missiles strikes which could be a possibility since they have cruise missiles ships in the mediterranean or all-out war, there is no way to question. >> indeed. there is knowing and then seeing. thank you. >>> thousands are traveling to the nation's capitol commemorating mutter mutter's landmark "i have a dream speech." >> reporter: as the sun came up over washington the stage was being set on the steps of the lincoln memorial to honor a speech by a civil rights icon. many here today were only children when dr. king made his speech 50 years ago. >> during the march i was six years old, and i thought it would be very exciting to come and be a part of this. >> when i heard about t i was on board. we know the situation of the state of affairs, and we're just looking for a stage. it's time for a change. >> it's a continuation of the dream. the dream we still have. i think there are a lo
going on in what rand paul just said. he's using this washington speech to describe a conference committee, which is the basic premise of government when two chambers have two competing bills. you come together and pass a compromised piece of legislation. that's not happening in washington these days on anything, let alone a major matter of something where they have fundamental disagreement with senate democrats obviously favoring the president's health care law and house republicans voting against it now 39, 40 times to repeal it. so that's not going to happen. so what happens in the meantime is you bring it up to this sort of again at the brink of a shutdown and the president has been very careful to pick at republicans saying, hey, if that happens, you're the one who is are going to take the blame. he has some numbers to back them up. he's been talking about some of these different numbers and some of the polls and house republicans are taking the majority to blame for dysfunction in washington and we've had these crisis government moments over the last several years where the
electric grid. then a look at a recent survey on american's view on aging. "washington journal" is next. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioned by the national captioning institute -www.ncicap.org--] ♪ host: one of the more news headlines this friday morning said the u.s. is treading lightly as the prices deepens in egypt. this has nearly 600 people have been killed amid what are being described as ferocious clashes between protestors and security forces. and another headline says egyptians are bracing for more bloodshed today. to the question that's out there. should the u.s. cut off foreign aid to egypt. a lot of folks are saying that but so far, it hasn't happened. what do you think? call numbers on your screen. or you can put your voice on the program via twitter, facebook and send us an maul -- -- e-mail theere is the front page of "wall street journal" today. the lead headlines says egyptians are bracing for more bloodshed. there is a photo of egyptian soldiers guarding an area around a
. obvious transition here, perhaps. washington state and colorado legalized recreational marijuana use in their states last year. but putting the laws into practice has been anything but smooth sailing. with pot still illegal on a federal level, there are a number of hurdles, including how to regulate the marketplace. cnbc's jane wells with more on the challenges ahead. >> craig, welcome to the mile high city. this is legal medical cannabis. you still can't grow or sell recreational pot yet, but it's coming. in the meantime, no matter how you get your pot, if you got 'em, you can smoke 'em. either here in colorado or in washington state where these pictures were shot. if you're at least 21 years old, only have an ounce but you can't resell it. there's quite a few differences between the two laws. but it turns out nothing has been easy in enacting these new regulations. labeling, tracking, all of that has turned out to be a little more difficult. for example, in washington, they're deciding they're going to cap production so that too much pot isn't grown and it ends up being exported ou
at the national press club in washington, d.c. he addressed a voter id laws and the feature of the republican party. this is about one hour. >> our speaker today is benjamin jealous,who at 35 became the youngest president and ceo of the national association for the advancement of colored people. a mixed race kid from california, jealous grew up in a family always challenged by the issue of race. according to an interview in "essence" magazine, his grandparents faced obstacles dating back to slavery. his mother helped desegregate her high school in baltimore, and joined sit-ins at lunch counters in virginia. his father told him what it was like to be the lone white guy at a lunch counter sit-in and getting worked over by the police, who saw him as a race traitor. as a kid, mr. jealous recalls being at a discount store with a black friend, and noticing a white lady peeking at them through the pegboard to make sure they were not stealing anything. he has led advocacy, but he could, at one time, qualify for mentorship at the national press club. reliable reports say he once tried his hand at inve
from washington with a preview. what about these new proposals do we expect to hear from the president? >> we expect him to talk about saving money. the real focus is going to be the middle class. and part of that is going to be restructuring how we do mortgages, trying to prevent the collapse of a freddie mac and fannie mae that we saw over the last several years and putting a lot more private money behind mortgages. he's also going to talk about the white house says saving $3,000 per family by making it easier to get mortgages and easier to refinance. for example, wiping out closing costs. if you re-fi to a lower term. what's significant here is where he's saying it. going back to arizona where he first addressed this issue four years ago. >> thank you. >>> and now here is your first look at this morning's dish of scrambled politics. here's something you don't hear every day. a politician being open about their future plans. wendy davis did that monday while addressing the national press club. >> i can say with absolute certainty that i will run for two offices. either the state sena
. >>> welcome back live to the lincoln memorial here as we mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington with the closing ceremonies at this hour. on the stage, you'll see the host for today's event, journalist soledad o'brien and actor and author hill harper welcoming the crowd that has gathered here. and the crowd gathering along the reflecting pool. trying to get the crowd energized as the speakers begin to work towards the podium. speaking to the folks who were here in 1963, encouraging them to stand up and be represented in the crowd that has gathered 50 years later. the invocation happening in just a few minutes here. the first speaker, ambassador andrew young, who if you saw barbara a barbara's story with him, has an incredible story to tell. we'll hear from others as well. back to you. >> now let's get the latest developments in syria. the u.n. special envoy to syria says evidence suggests some kind of chemical substance was used in an attack last week. the comments came as a team of u.n. inspectors continue, to look for evidence syrian troops used chemical weapons. the white hou
. if this is a strategy what is the strategy? >> lindy is an old roommate from mine of washington, d.c. and i've had several discussions with him that both of us disagree on. the strategy has to be this. my concern friends will get mad a at me i do agree with governor rendell. we have to talk about the issues important to the country and say how do we get real solutions and conservative principles and take this to this administration and the democrats that control the senate to get things done. talking about these issues like an impeachment that are not going to happen doesn't help that agenda and it doesn't help us, not only in policy on, but it doesn't help us in politics next november. >> always a pleasure, gentlemen. have a fantastic weekend. >> you too, craig. >>> president obama is on the road again today to promote his plan to make higher education more affordable. day two of his bus tour takes him to binghamton. followed by a stop at a college in scranton, pennsylvania. catch his town hall here on msnbc at 12:45 today. remember we are hours away from the expected resignation of san diego may
at downtown d.c. just off the national mall commemorating the march on washington for jobs and freedom led by martin luther king jr. on august 28, 1963. the anniversary itself is wednesday when another gathering is planned and president obama will be here. we'll have live coverage on c-span and c-span radio of that appearance. if you missed any of the rally that just ended we'll show you ighlights from that rally. >> for those of us who are from the south, 50 years ago we received our marching orders hen the prophet dr. king jr. quoted the prophet isiah, that have a dream. this is our hope. this is the faith that we go back to the south with. those are our marching orders. this is the faith that we go back to the south with. yes, the south where some are still trying to fight the civil war. yes, the south. where we are witnessing this vicious attack on voting rights and the blatant voter suppression by one particular political party. es, the south where young boys can't walk the street of his father's neighborhood without eing profiled, confronted, stalked, and finally murdered. watched ov
not a political dispute but more interesting, the ambassador to washington came out with that statement that the egyptian government was trying or at least going to review the u.s. aid and that certainly caught a lot of people here by surprise. in recent days the egyptian government has been trying to assert more of its sovereignty. it's one of the things it's criticized for, over the years it was seen that it was somewhat of a lap dog on the u.s. government's hand because the former regime of hosni mubarak was so closely allied to washington. this government is trying to distance itself from any type of foreign interference particularly those critical of its actions. when it comes to those governments that have been very close or supporting the government's crackdown they have been welcoming them and that's caught some people here by surprise. another point that caught people here off guard was the reference to the fact hat the united states and the taliban have both expressed reservations in terms of what is happening here on the ground and that was a point that the foreign minister a
feinstein, but if i recall in the washington post article, she commented to the washington post that she was not aware of the compliance audits until the washington post asked her about them. my question to you is, are you informed about what she saw? was she telling the washington post something different? >> if you have questions about her comments, it you should check with her. i read to you her on the record statement about this issue. what she may have been referring to in that report -- >> what did the senator mean when she was quoted? >> i do not have the store in front of me. i know that some members of congress have suggested that they did not see these nsa reports that were reported on by the washington post. but what they did see and what many of them were briefed on were the regular reports that are due to congress from the nsa as part of their oversight function. reports on a regular basis are made to members of congress and intelligence committees about some of these issues and some of the broader issues that allow congress to fulfill their responsibility to conduct oversig
.. >> the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. and later, senator tom coburn hears from his constituents during a town hall meeting in oklahoma. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: walt mossberg, has technology plateaued? >> guest: oh, no, absolutely not. absolutely not. technology is always changing and always coming up with -- technology companies are always coming up with something new, and there are new technology companies all the time incubating, a lot of them are in what we call stealth mode. we don't even know who they are. certain technologies plateau and things move on, but in general, no. not at all. >> host: i guess i ask that because the last couple years we've had the explosion of smartphones, we've had tablets come online. what's out there? >> guest: well, first of all, there are vast numbers of people especially in the less developed cups, but even in the developed countries who don't own a smartphone and, certainly, there are vast thurms that don't own -- numbers th
washington journal for august the third. potential attacks by al qaeda has part of the state department to issue a worldwide alert for travelers. the attacks may occur before the end of august with north africa and the middle east been the focus of that threat. wall street journal reporting that a bill is being proposed that would double the amount of guest worker visas. turning to the economy, the unemployment figure is at 7.4% with 162,000 jobs created in august. that is the economy nationwide. we want to get your take on the economy. is it getting better or worse yet go and how much washington how -- or worse yet go and how much does washington -- influence does washington have. again, for our first 45 minutes on the to get your take economy. you can call us on those lines. if you want to reach out to us on social media, twitter @ cspanwj. on facebook we have about 13 comments. you can always send us an e-mail at journal@c-span.org. here are the figures from the front page of the wall street journal -- it also talks about the unemployment figure, standing at 7.4%. that is
of getting federal dollars? our viewers know that washington is talking about sequestration, spending cuts, annual spending bills are not getting done. how do you get the money? >> the next to jump in you have on will definitely have an answer for that. >> what do you think? >> it is steadily at the left, a difficult thing to come by these days, federal dollars. thankfully we had the foresight -- and when i say we i don't include myself. leaders before us. the foresight to see the need to build to 50 feet and to authorize 505 feet. they get that accomplished in early 2000. so we are well ahead of the curve. the good thing about it is it is cheaper to dredge year in virginia and then it is virtually anywhere else on the east coast. we have this beautiful area right behind you. a great outlet for the port. very inexpensive for us to build. >> you know, we have soft bottom out here. we are really just picking of sand and relocating it. other ports, new york, for example, it is bad rock. dynamite, explode. move it off. it might be a difference of $40 per cubic square foot to 400. the advantage
. programs on every first lady from martha washington wine mckinley. tonight, harriet lane. quite she is probably the most tragic of all the first ladies. she hated it with a passion. she did not move into the white house with peace. >> they had eight rooms they had to furnish. when she arrived, she basically holed up and spent much of her time writing letters to her dead son. she called them my presaged child. a very poignant letter. , andey were returning there was a terrible accident. . it was devastating for the family. god.she concluded this was forhe house was too much jane to take care of. i don't think she was interested in housekeeping particularly. >> most regarded peer us as a failure in the office. >> it was the happiest of all presidencies. >> good evening. on this program, we learned about the final first ladies of the antebellum era. whose tenurepierce was defined by overwhelming loss. the time she and her husband are brought to the executive mansion, they have lost all fore of their young sons the next 45 minutes, we will .elve into jane pierce good evening. welcome. >
. .. with the president to announce plans for the march on washington. in support of the civil rights act. >> june 12th, 1963 as everest was returning home for the naacp meeting member byron shot him in his driveway as he was getting out of his car. evers was killed instantly. ♪ ♪ >> randolph and fellow americans , the national urban league is honored to be a participant in this historic occasion. our presence here reflects not only the civil rights communities increasing the awareness of the urban league, but most important it says and i hope what and clear that while intelligence, maturity and strategy dictates a civil rights agency we use different methods and we are all united as never before on the goal of first class citizenship. >> to present to you the moral leader of the nation. i have the pleasure to present to you dr. martin luther king. [applause] i am happy to join with you today what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation. [applause] five years ago, a great american in the shadow we stand today signed the emancipation proclamatio
us washington. >> reporter: veronica, good morning. the overwhelming message out of the washington is that president obama need to be careful as he tries to trike a balance between restore the public's confidence and trust and protecting national security. even while vacationing on martha's vineyard president obama couldn't escape a moment of apparent frustration on the golf course. but in washington, more troubles await the commander in chief. lawmakers are criticizing the president's plan by nsa programs exposed by leaker edward snowden. >> he's failed to explain these programs which are lawful, which save lives. >> we need to do better in educating our public so they are are not fearful that we the government are violating their privacy. the worm director of the nsa added oversight to hurt a key part of the program moving quickly to protect national security. >> so you need to be careful about how many processes you put in there. the >> reporter: the leak seemed to push russian relations to a post cold war low. president obama has now canceled the meeting with russian president
is chief washington correspondent. >> reporter: the ally has always been the regime from iran. but the world heard a curiously neutral statement that could even have been interpreted as welcoming u.s. military action against the assad regime. >>translator: iran, victim of chemical weapons itself reminds the entire international community to use whatever is in its power to prevent use of such weapons anywhere, especially in syria. >> reporter: yet the speaker from the iranian parliament came direct threat against washington's staunchest ally, israel. >>translator: illegitimate planning by the west warns you may start a military operation against syria but you will not be the ones that will end the war. you also need to be worried about illegitimate zionist child in the region. >> reporter: syria vowed to lash out against israel and they blame the israelis for the current crisis. >> the only party that benefits from the instability in the area is the continuation of the israeli policies of occupation of the territories. >> reporter: in tel aviv, citizens are lining up to protect
in march 2011. in a washington post piece today, they write about that just a little bit. they say despite government assurances that they would protect the right of peaceful protesters, massacres only increased in severity, and the serious government deployed tanks and rooftop snipers and established checkpoints to control movements. this was back in 2011. a point out the defection of officers, with the free serious army back in july 2011, and the video of the officers issued at that time. here is kevin. he is calling from fort wayne, indiana, on our independent line. >> thank you, first of all, c- span for airing this program tonight. it was a wonderful display of democracy. in terms of the position of where i feel our government should take, i was in total agreement with the representative from new hampshire added would be nice and would be refreshing if forth itsould carry constitutional duties, because if any military action is taken, any form of military action is taken, we are first and foremost looking at committing an act of war. therefore, congress should be involved in deciding
in washington. we are going to tell you about the controversy it is generating when we come back. time now is 7:12. the nest has been getting a little too quiet of late. so i decided it was time to find some real harmony with nature. [ screaming ] whoo! oh, yeah. elmo! [ howling ] mmm! [ eagle chirps ] [ train whistles ] [ bird chirping ] [ screaming ] [ tuba bellows ] whoa. hey! [ screaming ] [ snoring ] music to mom's ears. we may live in houses, but we're born for busch gardens. that you may not have time to roll out dough for a perfectly flaky crust that's made from scratch. or enough time to mix vegetables with all white meat chicken and a homemade gravy. she knows you may not have a moment to crimp the edges of your favorite chicken pot pie. but marie callender's does. and when she's done, all you need to do is find time to grab someone special, sit down, and savor. marie callender's. it's time to savor. ♪ >> we want to say thank you for everyone that is sharing their back to school pictures. this is savion. this is the first day of kindergarten. >> mom, i don't feel like smiling. maybe
's no intelligence saying al qaeda is backing off. bob orr, cbs news, washington. >>> baseball slugger alex rodriguez has until thursday to officially appeal a suspension that would keep him out of baseball through next season. rodriguez and 12 other big leaguers were punished following baseball's investigation of performance-enhancing drugs, but it was rodriguez who was hit hardest. he was back on the field last night, his first major league game of the year. jericka duncan reports. >> reporter: the crowd in chicago where the yankees took on the white sox last night greeted alex rodriguez with some cheers. but mostly jeers as he returns to the majors after learning his fate. rodriguez hit a single in his first at-bat but his return to the yankees following injury was not the comeback he wanted. earlier in the day, major league baseball announced rodriguez will be suspended for a record 211 games, through the end of the 2014 season. >> it's been crazy, but from this point on, i'm going to do my very best to focus on baseball. >> reporter: that may be easier said than done. rodriguez said he'll appeal
. he is aligned with solutions. that lineve to have of thinking in washington dc. it comes to solutions, what do you think he offers to problems that in your mind exists? he addresses personal responsibility, which our country needs more and more. the -- makes people are a silly responsible. you can take a look at his life and past experience. he came from a poverty situation and is one of the most successful success stories in the united states. he would be a fantastic leader for us at this time. host: how did he come to your attention? every time he speaks he just reinforces in what i believe and have come to believe. he has common sense with his answers and thoughts. , as far as heon goes, he has appeared several times on this program. if you want to stay -- if you want to see things he's said or speeches he's given, i invite you to go to our video library. you can see our archive of what's available about the person. washington dc is up next, democrats line, anthony. caller: good morning. being a democrat i honestly believe hillary clinton is going always iood -- he has believe -- r
is this time for the president? congress is away from washington, members are in their home district. in the last couple of weeks of august, what can he do having the stage to himself here in washington? guest: this is a usual trend for the president over the summertime. his approval ratings have dipped. is -- right now he has the stage to himself. it is critical and hard to overstate the importance of framing the message ahead of these fights. we have seen the polls over the summer. when it comes to the budget showdown president does have an advantage. it it is important for the white house to hold onto this advantage ahead of the fight with congressional republicans. negotiations continue over the budget and of course the debt ceiling. host: she is the deputy white house editor for politico. give us the latest on the white house and the situation in egypt right now. is -- the president only public statement he gave is about egypt. we are seeing the white house handing a no good options for the president, increasing congressional pressure to cut off age up entirely. we are continuin
. a decision to cutoff aid would carry wide reprocushions. al jazeera, washington. >> he's the associate professor of literature. welcome. >> thank you. >> give me your rea*bs to what you're seeing in egypt today and in washington. what if the united states cuts aid. what would that mean? >> i think united states should cut aid it seems to me that aid mostly to american. military cooperations for one thing. it also goes directly in to the military which is a guanator in egypt. that's been the case for a while. it seems to me that is increasingly of the society. >> the fact that egypt has been historically a strong allie of the united states what does that mean are regard to this money? >> what it means is an allie of the united states should also follow the same kinds of values that the united states says. but if the united states is in fact going to be -- also the united states is at fault. >> it really isn't as simple as pro-morsi supporters. >> oh, absolutely. things in egypt are very complicated. there's contests for power among various in the country. each one wants to claim the ma
made in washington and agreed by the government here, then that's really why we're here, because washington feels there should be some bombs falling this weekend. now, many atrocities have taken place in the last two years since the conflict began. shirley, those seeking to take military action could wait a few days longer to assure that the facts are straight but it's obvious there's no threats to this journey of the uk that we know that the government seeks military action in order to deter and undermines chemical weapons, that's fine. that it may well see, that's fine, although military action has to be sanctioned by law. but surely, it should wait until the full conclusive proof is available their fight by the >> that has descended the civil war. the recent spill regarding militant objection has been confusing. last friday at united states and the uk governments were pressing for weapons inspectors to be allowed in c. on monday the inspector general's went albeit in difficult circumstances but on monday evening all indications were that the u.s. and uk had made up their minds
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